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Strava Heatmaps

training strava cycling running by Simon Mayes (@msyea)

Look at those heat-veins across London. I’ve been watching the heatmaps for a while. They’re a great way to see the ground you’ve covered. See http://labs.strava.com/heatmap/ if you’re interested in the global map or https://www.strava.com/athlete/heatmaps to see yours.

Running Heatmap

You can see from this that I like running round the canals in East London and along the river. I have a few longer runs; out to Battersea Park, out to the Royal Dock and up to the Castle Climbing Centre in Stoke Newington. I also spent some time in Walthamstow and ran in Epping Forest.

Strava Heatmap Running

Cycling Heatmap

There’s alot more congestion here as I use my bike to get around town. You can still see my hotspots though. You can see my Walthamstow time quite clearly (I had to commute in regularly) as can you see my visits out to Clapham and Wandsworth. The loop round the Royal Docks was from the London Triathlon.

Strava Heatmap Cycling

Bit random but I updated them for the first time in a while today and was quite impressed.

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Val d'Isère

climbing ski-touring skiiing val-disere tignes espace-killy by Simon Mayes (@msyea)

Val d’Isère what a blowout. Espace Killy still my favourite ski area!

I’ve just come back from another week of ski touring and piste skiing in Val d’Isère and Tignes. The highlights were the early morning skinning up to and beyond La Folie Douce and a day tour up to Dome de Parmecou and back down Grand Balme.

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Quick Rave About CircleCI

technology circleci vetcraft github composer npm bower gulp laravel by Simon Mayes (@msyea)

I’ve just deployed CircleCI for a VetCraft, a client of mine. Continuous Integration and Delivery is always impresses me. It follows our GitHub repository and when we commit to the development branch, it checks out the code, downloads our dependencies (Composer, NPM and Bower), runs our build script (Gulp for Laravel) and runs our tests (PHPUnit). If all is successful it gzips the results and scps it to our development server, brings the server down, runs database migrations, a few more tests and then brings the server back up.

This is all automatically done from a commit/merge to our development branch. Takes me 1 second, CircleCI about 3 minutes, allows us to work faster and saves me hours per week.

:heart: CircleCI.